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Bromley, David

Scott Hicks
Other titles:

1999
Keywords: Scott Hicks
, Performing Arts Film-maker,

Notes:
This is the third portrait that David Bromley has painted of film director Scott Hicks. Bromley was incredibly moved by Shine and when he met Hicks “was not surprised that he had made the film. His vision and his sensibilities show in his face and eyes. To paint him, I knew would be an enjoyable experience.”
Bromley asked if he could paint Hicks again this year believing that what he had learnt doing the first two portraits would help him capture Hicks more completely this time. The sitting was done at one of Hicks’ favourite places – a rocky area at Port Elliot on the beachfront in South Australia.
Hicks has just finished making a new film, Snow Falling on Cedars, based on David Guterson’s award-winning novel.
Born in England in 1960, Bromley arrived in Australia in 1964. Since 1987 he has had numerous solo exhibitions around the country. In 1993 he won the Fishers Ghost Award and was a finalist in the Moët & Chandon Touring Exhibition. His work is represented in public and private collections in Australia and Germany. Scott Hicks, the 'progeny of adventurous parents... was born in Uganda and lived in Kenya, just outside Nairobi, until the age of ten. His family then moved, first to England and, when he was 14, on to Adelaide, Australia. Though British citizens, his father and grandfather were born respectively in Burma and the West Indies, and spent their lives in exotic, far-flung locales as civil engineers building railways, bridges and harbors. His mother is Scottish. ...He won an Emmy in 1994 for Submarines:Sharks of Steel and a coveted Peabody Award in 1989 for The Great Wall of Iron....(he) was propelled to the forefront of international filmmakers in 1996, following the release of hs film Shine. Its triumphant premiere at the Sundance Film Festival was just the beginning of world-wide box-office success and numerous honors, including seven Acadamy Award nominations.' (Source: www.snowfallingoncedars.com/filmmakers).

Medium:

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 20 March - 9 May 1999 (4)
Illustrations:
Dodd, Terri, 'Contemporary painting wins 78th Archibald Prize', 'Australian Artist', Volume XV, Number 12, June 1999, p 27, colour.

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Bromley, David

Strongest man of the games
Other titles:

2000
Keywords: Dean Lukin, Sport Weightlifing,

Medium:

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 18 March - 7 May 2000 [Daily Telegraph Sporting Portrait Prize] (3)
Illustrations:
'The Daily Telegraph - Archibalds 2000 Souvenir Guide', Sydney, 2000, p 11, colour.

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Bromley, David

Long Tom
Other titles:

2001
Keywords: Long Tom Tjapanangka, Pintupi, Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander subject, Visual Arts Painter,

Notes:
Long Tom Tjapanangka is from the Pintupi tribe. Born around 1930, he was a stockman and police tracker before concentrating on his art. In her book Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Susan McCulloch writes that: “Long Tom’s large, bold planes of colour and sharp observation of the elements of his country have made his paintings as memorable as they are identifiable.” He won the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Prize in 1999 and is represented in many public collections nationally. David Bromley loves Long Tom’s work and collects it. When he saw a picture of the artist he was very taken by the way he looked and wanted to paint him out of a respect for both the artist and his work. Learning that Long Tom would be coming to Adelaide for an exhibition, Bromley arranged to meet Tjapanangka. Long Tom always wears his stockman’s hat so that was a given,” says Bromley. With his colour choice, Bromley says he wanted to avoid the predictable reds and ochres. “I wanted the work to go beyond colour so that it becomes a portrait of a great man,” says Bromley. Born in England in 1960, Bromley arrived in Australia in 1964. He lives and works in Adelaide. He has had regular solo exhibitions in Brisbane, Adelaide and Sydney since 1989. He won the Fisher’s Ghost Festival Art Prize in 1993 and was a finalist in the Moët & Chandon Touring Exhibition in 1993 and 1994. In 2000 he was represented in group exhibitions internationally. He was a finalist in the 2000 Doug Moran National Portrait Prize, the 2000 Sporting Prize and the 1999 Archibald with a portrait of filmmaker Scott Hicks. His work is held in many private and public collections nationally. Ref: Text panel.
Medium:

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 17 March - 13 May 2001 (4)
Illustrations:
Dodd, Terri, 'Class act', 'Australian Artist', Volume XVII, Number 11, May 2001, p 47, colour.

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Bromley, David

Charles Blackman
Other titles:

2002
Keywords: Charles Blackman OBE, Multiple Portrait, Visual Arts Painter,

Notes:
Charles Blackman is one of David Bromley’s great heroes; someone whose work he admired “from the very, very beginning. Keen to paint him for the Archibald Prize, Bromley was introduced to Blackman by a friend. Bromley admits that he felt pretty nervous to be finally meeting one of Australia’s greatest artists.
“I knew I wanted to do something large-scale with his work in behind and I was hoping there would be something recent at his house that I could work with.” When it turned out that there was a recent painting, Bromley asked Blackman if he could use it in the background of the portrait and Blackman agreed.
“Some of my friends have said they felt I could have used some of Blackman’s more typical imagery [Alice in Wonderland, schoolgirls under mushroom hats, girls and cats with flowers etc] but this is about him now. These images have the feeling and emotion of the past but they are recent.“
The portrait was done with just one sitting as Bromley didn’t want to impose, particularly since Blackman’s health isn’t what it was. “You just go in respectfully, but he was absolutely charming,” says Bromley.
“I already had the canvas stretched and I loved the size,” says Bromley. “I had planned a vertical portrait but I loved the horizontal image of his work so I began to think maybe something could be done with two heads, with a subtle shift in mood.” As for the colour of the painting, “I look at his images as something precious so the gold goes back to him being something of an icon. It’s certainly a portrait by a young artist admiring an older artist.”
Born in England in 1960, Bromley arrived in Australia in 1964. He lives and works in Adelaide. He has had regular solo exhibitions in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth since 1989. He won the Fisher’s Ghost Festival Art Prize in 1993 and was a finalist in the Moet and Chandon Touring Exhibition in 1993 and 1994. He was a finalist in the 2000 Doug Moran National Portrait Prize, the 2000 Sporting Portrait Prize and the 1999 and 2001 Archibald Prize. His work is held in many private and public collections nationally

Medium:

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 1 June - 21 July 2002 (2)
Illustrations:
"Cherry Hood wins $35,000 Archibald Prize : all the finalists in this year's Archibald Prize", Australian artist, no.218, Aug. 2002, p.11, col. ill.

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Bromley, David

McLean & friends
Other titles:

2004
Keywords: McLean Edwards, Visual Arts Painter,

Notes:
David Bromley owned several paintings and drawings by McLean Edwards before meeting the artist. ‘I’m a great admirer of his work,’ says Bromley. Now friends, they both decided to enter the 2004 Archibald Prize. ‘McLean said to me, “What happens if I pip you to the post and I get selected and you don’t?” And I said, “then the judges are very wise because you’re a better painter than me,”’ chuckles a modest Bromley. They were both selected.
‘I live with McLean’s work and I love the characters he conjures up. So I thought to immerse him in those characters was a nice opportunity for narrative – and a nice opportunity for me to paint those figures because they’re a joy to have around.’ Asked about his choice of colour, Bromley says: ‘In some ways there’s a slightly macabre, old circus quality about McLean’s work that I sometimes see in blurry greys. He’ll put out the candy pink and yet you don’t necessarily think of the colour. He’s such a brave painter. He grabs colours and puts them on but there’s also a classical quality to his work, he defies categorisation … I used colours and then put a wash over him to bring him forward and push the other characters back.’
Born in England in 1960, Bromley arrived in Australia in 1964. He lives and works in Adelaide and since 1987 has exhibited regularly in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, London, Johannesburg and Tokyo. He won the Fisher’s Ghost Festival Art Prize in 1993 and was a finalist in the Moet & Chandon Touring Exhibition in 1993 and 1994. He was selected in the 2000 Doug Moran National Portrait Prize and the 2000 Sporting Portrait Prize. This is his fourth time in the Archibald. His work is held in the collections of the Art Gallery of South Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of Western Australia among others.

Medium: acrylic on canvas

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 27 March - 16 May 2004 (4)
Illustrations:
'Craig Ruddy's courage is rewarded: the Winner and all the finalists in the Art Gallery of New South Wales' 2004 Archibald Prize', 'Australian Artist', Volume XX, Number 12, June 2004, p 46, colour.

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Bromley, David

Louise Olsen
Other titles:

2008
Keywords: Louise Olsen, Visual Arts Jeweller Fashion Designer,

Notes:
Louise Olsen is a director and designer at Dinosaur Designs, which she co-founded in 1985 with Stephen Ormandy and Liane Rossler. The three of them met while studying drawing and painting. Now internationally renowned, Dinosaur Designs sells its distinctive jewellery and homewares in its own stores in Sydney, Melbourne and New York as well as exporting to over 20 countries.

David Bromley has known Olsen for many years. “She’s a person I really like and I’ve always thought that she has a very special face that would be wonderful to paint,” he says. “I am involved in design and furniture as well as working as an artist and I love what they do and what they make at Dinosaur.”

The portrait of Olsen has been in Bromley’s head for a long time. “I wanted it to be fairly pared back so I went very acoustic with it,” he says. “It has a reasonable boldness to it. But Louise isn’t a very gregarious person so I wanted it to have a subtlety as well without too many raucous colours – even though the pieces she makes use luminous colours.”

Bromley melds figurative expressionism and pop art in an engaging, colourful style. His best-known work draws on imagery from Boy’s Own annuals and old magazines and explores themes of childhood innocence, lost and found. Recently, he has used layering and texturing techniques in explorations of the female figure.

Increasingly in demand as a portraitist, he has painted Scott Hicks, Hugo Weaving, Kylie Minogue, Megan Gale and Kristy Hinze among others.

Born in England in 1960, Bromley arrived in Australia in 1964. He now lives and works in Melbourne. Listed among Australian Art Collector’s 50 most collectable artists, he has exhibited in London, Paris, Tokyo, New York, Moscow, New Zealand and Singapore as well as Australia. This is his fifth time in the Archibald Prize.

Medium: synthetic polymer paint on linen with metallic leaf

Prize awarded: No

Archibald, Exhibited: 8 March - 18 May 2008 (9)
Illustrations:
'Every picture tells a story', Australian Artist, Volume XXIV, Number 11, May 2008, p 16, colour.
Cairis, Analiese; Litson, Jo; Blunden Jennifer; Tigals, Kirsten; Stirling, Mim; Wright, Carley, 2008. '08 Archibald Prize', Sydney: AGNSW, 2008, plate 9, colour.
Pettey, William, 'Diary: Sibling rivalry hits the wall', Sun Herald [Sydney]: S, 2 March 2008, p S4, colour (visible in background).
Smee, Sebastian, 'Put on a happy face', Australian, February 29, 2008, p 16, colour.
Pearce, Alyosha, 'A packer's eyes on the prize', Sydney Morning Herald, 29 February 2008, p 14, colour.

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